Zaragoza. Logistics Center

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CURRICULUM

To receive the MIT-Zaragoza Master of Engineering in Logistics degree, students must complete courses in the following areas: Core, Electives, Advanced Topics Seminar, Thesis, and International Exchange.



FALL

INT. EXCHANGE

SPRING
LEADERSHIP FOCUS

Personal

Team

Thought




PRACTICAL FOCUS

Integrated Operations

Organization & Change

Strategy




COURSEWORK

Logistics, Information & Financial Systems

Analytical Methods

Supply Chain Innovation & Leadership Series

Supply Chain Challenge

Electives

Thesis Project
 

Orientation Period - ZLC campus, Spain

Registration
Orientation: Team Building and Career Workshops
Preparatory Sessions: Mathematics and Finance

Fall Semester - ZLC campus, Spain

Logistics Systems:

This course provides the students with an understanding of how logistics systems behave. Critical factors (costs, variability, labor/space/financial constraints) have a significant impact on the system performance. Commonly used transportation network optimization, routing and scheduling with inventory consideration, capacity management, flow management principles and push/pull systems are discussed. The ultimate goal is to equip students with the necessary tools to improve the system performance (i.e., increasing throughput, improving customer service) in a supply chain setting given the constraints.

Inventory Systems:

This course provides one of the key building blocks for an in- depth understanding of supply chain management issues. Students learn the key tradeoffs involved in making supply chain decisions using quantitative models and the strategic insights derived from them. Key areas covered include demand forecasting, inventory theory and control, and models of sourcing and procurement.

Analytical Methods:

The emphasis is on developing the ability to identify and use the appropriate technique for practical application rather than the underlying theory. It will enable the students to think structurally about decision problems and become intelligent users of management science techniques. The course builds from a basis of calculus, probability, & statistics to introduce fundamental modeling frameworks, such as math programming, networks, queuing, and simulation. Spreadsheet based models are used extensively throughout the course to make it more relevant and rewarding for the students.

Supply Chain Information Systems:

This course offers a practical basis to understand basic architectures and specific requirements of Supply Chain Information Systems (SCIS), enabling students to specify and develop logistics and SCM software on a conceptual level, to evaluate and select systems, and to investigate new concepts and technologies such as XML, BPML, Web services, andWorkflow Management.

Financial Systems and Supply Chain Management:

This course links supply chain management to the systems and objectives of the corporation. Topics include tools and frameworks for financial and economic analysis, activity based costing, international financial flows, and taxation. Students learn to define their role in an organization, analyze the position of a corporation in the marketplace, leverage financial information for decision making, and value the impact of supply chain effectiveness on financial performance.

Statistics for Supply Chain Management:

This course reinforces the quantitative skills needed to make good supply chain decisions. Common probability and statistics tools such as the Bayes' theorem, probability distributions, point estimation, statistical intervals, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, linear regression, are linked to the operations and supply chain problems. Students focus on these topics as the first building block for the quantitative models and necessary analysis.

Spanish Language:

Introduction to the Spanish language. Students who demonstrate proficiency in Spanish, in lieu of attending the lectures, may be assigned advanced projects utilizing Spanish in the area of logistics & supply chain management.

Thesis Seminar Proposal:

The contents of the thesis seminar course will contain: thesis process - technical writing - presentation skills. This seminar will organize the students into groups working on parallel topics and make sure that each student's project is launched.

Advanced Topics:

The Advanced Topics Seminar spans several terms, featuring elite professors who offer short, intense seminars on advanced topics. We typically feature professors from MIT and from leading schools in Europe. Some of these seminars may be scheduled as the year progresses.

International Exchange - MIT campus, USA

Leading Global Supply Chains:

Reinforces supply chain concepts and develops management and teamwork skills.  MIT students participate with their peers from CTL’s sister centers in Spain, Malaysia, Colombia, Luxembourg and China.  This is a very intense IAP course that includes the following components:
  1. 5 lectures by leading MIT researchers each with short homework assignments,
  2. 6 lectures by C-level industry executives followed by filmed small team interviews, 
  3. 6 rounds of the team-based Fresh Connection management simulation game,
  4. 6 in-depth leadership workshops,
  5. a major team-based APICS-Sponsored Case Competition (paper, presentation, judges),
  6. 6 Supply Chain Research workshops each with hands-on team-based assignments , 
  7. 1 day-long  tour and one ½ day tour of best-in-class supply chain operations,
  8. a major Research Expo (poster session) attended by 200-300 supply chain executives
Spring Semester - ZLC campus, Spain

Logistics Facilities & Operations:

Exploration of the technological and managerial issues involved in the design and operation of distribution and logistics physical facilities and associated information technology in an enterprise wise supply chain. Includes day-long site visits to logistics operations in the local area, as well as day-long software tutorials on commercial-grade software packages used in the design of logistics networks. The curriculum also includes lectures and case studies from faculty and professional logistics consultants focusing on the design and operation of efficient logistics facilities.

Supply Chain Strategy
:

In this course students learn how supply chain strategies must be designed to fit with the particular requirements of various competitive environments, as well as a company's competitive strategy. It also investigates barriers to integrating supply chains, including behavioral issues (e.g., misaligned incentives and change management) and operational execution problems. The course gives special emphasis to the tools students will need to participate effectively in decisions about operations in a global economy.

Supply Chain Network Design:

The objective of this course is to establish a sound methodological and practical basis for enabling students to understand the basics of Supply Chain Network Design, to specify and develop logistics models, gain insights on the major trade-offs encountered when designing a supply chain network, and to understand the relationship between the supply chain strategy and the business strategy. The course provides a review/introduction of basic facility location models with special attention to discrete models. The objective of this course is to allow students to be able to make a basic evaluation of a supply chain design, identifying opportunities for improvement and assessing the quality of a proposal for supply chain design when encountered in their professional lives.

System Dynamics:

Uses a mixture of simulation models, role-playing games, and case studies to develop principles for successful management of complex strategies in a dynamic world. Case studies of successful strategy design using system dynamics. Considers strategic issues such as business cycles, market growth and stagnation, the diffusion of new technologies, the misuse of forecasts, and the rationality of managerial decision making.

Advanced Topics:

The Advanced Topics Seminar spans several terms, featuring elite professors who offer short, intense seminars on advanced topics. We typically feature professors from MIT and from leading schools in Europe. Some of these seminars may be scheduled as the year progresses.
 
Thesis Seminar Executive Summary:

The Thesis Project, which receives academic credits, is a requirement for each student. Typically, the research directly involves one or more companies or organizations. Occasionally, research topics that are larger in scope require a team of master's students. A faculty supervisor is assigned to each thesis project to provide guidance for the research effort and writing process. Final presentations are made to the thesis committee, which includes the participating company representatives.

Electives are only offered in the spring. Below is a list of electives that were offered over the past five years:

  • Energy Risk Management
  • Pricing and Revenue Management
  • Factory Logistics
  • Advanced Planning & Execution Systems
  • Impact and Use of Auto-ID & RFID
  • Operations Strategy
  • Supply Chain Contracts & Coordination
  • Advanced Forecasting
  • Service Operations Logistics
  • Reverse Logistics
  • Decision Support Systems
  • Project Management
  • Mass Customization
  • Economics of the Firm for Supply Chain Management
  • Retail Supply Chain Management
  • Humanitarian and Public Health Supply Chains
  • Freight Transportation
  • Manufacturing Logistics
Master Thesis - ZLC campus, Spain

Each ZLOG student is required to complete a research thesis to gain academic credits. It provides an opportunity for students to conceive and execute independent research on a topic chosen by the student. Typically, the research directly involves one or more companies or organizations. Each year many ZLOG students complete their thesis projects working with our partner companies on challenging and innovative research projects through the ZAP Program.

 Some companies that have collaborated with ZLOG research projects in the past are:

 


 
 
 
 
 

Occasionally, research topics that are larger in scope require a team of master's students. A faculty supervisor is assigned to each thesis project to provide guidance for the research effort and writing process. Final presentations are made at an event open to the supply chain community. In addition, a panel of experienced academic and industry representatives select the "ZLOG Best Thesis Award" in recognition of the most outstanding Master's Thesis Project of the Class. 

  • ZLOG Best Thesis Award 2018 went to to Pilar Albar, Bruna Basile and Fernanda Caropresso for their thesis titled Network Capacity Plan 
  • ZLOG Best Thesis Award 2007 - This award was sponsored by the Instituto Aragonés de Fomento (Aragonese Institute of Public Works) of the Department of Industry, Commerce and Tourism of the Government of Aragon. The winner, Gemma Berenguer i Falguera, received €6,000 for her thesis: Impact of Due-Date Requirements on Capacity Management 

Special Topics Seminar - ZLC campus, Spain

The Special Topics Seminar spans several terms, featuring elite professors who offer short, intense seminars on advanced topics. We typically feature professors from MIT and from leading schools around the globe. Some examples include: Prof. Yossi Sheffi "Supply Chain Resilience"; Prof. Amir Samii "Energy and Sustainable Supply Chains"; Prof. Richard Pibernik "S&OP".

Commencement Ceremony - University of Zaragoza, Spain

ZLOG students celebrate the completion of their studies in May with a special Commencement Ceremony and reception hosted by the President of Aragon and Rector of the University of Zaragoza.
Past commencement addresses have been given by: